Athletics Department News | Peninsula College Athletics

Athletics Department News

PORT ANGELES, Washington (May 11, 2018) – Peninsula College will induct four individuals, Mark Amaral, Curt Bagby, Kent Brauninger, and the late William Quenette, as well as the 1999-2000 men’s basketball team into its Pirate Athletics Hall of Fame at a ceremony scheduled for June 2.

It will be Peninsula’s third induction event, this one set for 5 p.m., June 2, at the Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course banquet room.

“Our committee came up with a great new class of inductees, representing men’s and women’s sports over a span of 37 years of our athletic history,” said Rick Ross, Associate Dean for Athletics and Student Life. “I am personally very happy for Mark, Curt, Kent and the family of Coach Quenette. It will also be great to see the players from the 1999-2000 team again. They had quite a run, winning our first ever league championship and posting the most wins ever for a Pirate basketball team. It’s also cool that they’ve mostly stayed in contact for all these years.”

The event will begin with a social time at 5 p.m. with the program starting at 5:30 p.m. Light refreshments and hors devours will be served, along with a no-host bar. Inductees are asked to reserve space for themselves and their immediate family members by contacting Ross at rross@pencol.edu. Admission is free for inductees, families, friends and guests as space allows.

Mark Amaral
Peninsula College is proud to have been on the front end of Coach Amaral’s outstanding career in college basketball. The College hired Amaral to re-launch men’s basketball in 1997 after the sport was dropped in 1981. He brought six years of assistant coaching experience to Peninsula from Carroll College, Lewis-Clark State and Montana Tech, but was quick to build an exciting and competitive Pirate men’s basketball program as its head coach. He put together a winning record in just his second season (19-9) and then went 28-6 in his third year to win North Region Coach of the Year - and the first league championship in the history of Peninsula College. In his three seasons at Peninsula, he went 58-31, and laid the groundwork for what has been a very successful modern history of Pirate men’s basketball. After three years at the Pirate helm, Coach Amaral went on to join the staff at UC Santa Barbara where he helped coach the Gauchos to two Big West championships and a trip to the NCAA Tournament in a seven-year stint. From there, he served two years at Colorado State, two years at Cal Poly, and then seven years as Associate Head Coach at Pepperdine, where he helped the Wave post its first winning season since 2005 in 2014-15, qualifying for the post season two straight years. Just this spring Coach Amaral accepted a position as Head Assistant Basketball Coach for the Xinjiang Flying Tigers of the CBA in China.

Curt Bagby
Peninsula College was fortunate to hire Curt Bagby as its first intercollegiate women’s basketball coach when the College relaunched basketball in 1997. Coach Bagby came to Peninsula following an outstanding high school career coaching girls’ basketball and football at Port Angeles High School. In his final nine years coaching the Roughrider basketball team, he won seven league championships and made five trips to the state playoffs, including a second-place finish, the best ever in PA girls’ basketball history. At Peninsula, he assembled the very first women’s intercollegiate basketball team from the ground up in 1997 and then went on to win 57 games in four years. Coach Bagby took the Pirates to their first two Northwest Athletic Conference Basketball Tournament appearances in school history and twice won North Region Coach of the Year honors. His overall body of work included 41 years as a highly respected and successful basketball and football coach. His historic and notable contribution to Peninsula College was as a women’s basketball “founding father” who not only achieved success himself, but also laid the ground work for the program’s success that followed.

Kent Brauninger
Kent Brauninger came to Peninsula College in 1968 to teach mathematics. He volunteered to help Athletic Director Art Feiro and the Pirate basketball program as a score clock operator. An outstanding math professor by day, he was at the scorer’s table at night, keeping the precise time and score for Pirate basketball games from 1968-1981 when the College dropped intercollegiate sports. He then returned to the score clock in 1997 when the College re-launched basketball - and he’s been at the table almost every home game since. Kent ran the score clock for more than 500 basketball games. He is also one of Peninsula’s major Pirate Boosters and one of the Colleges’ longest-running Pirate fans. He retired from Peninsula in 2000, but not only stayed on to teach math part time for a few years, but has also remained as a volunteer at the scorer’s table for 18 years…and counting.

William “Bill” Quenette
The late Coach Quenette was the first coach in Peninsula College sports history, hired to teach physical education and to form a “club” basketball team in 1962-63, one year after the College was founded. He then coached Peninsula’s first intercollegiate basketball team a year later in 1963-64 and went on to serve four years as the Pirate head coach. He also coached golf, baseball and track during that time, and helped design the current Pirate gym, which was built in 1966, the year he moved back to Moorhead, Minnesota, where he had started his coaching career at Concordia College in 1957. Coach Quenette would spend the remainder of his 47-year career teaching PE and coaching football, boys and girls basketball, baseball, and golf for Moorhead High School. He was also on the basketball staff at Concordia, and football staff at Fargo Shanley High School in North Dakota. Coach Quenette, who passed away in 2013 following a rich life dedicated to his family, his church, his community, and thousands of student athletes, now resides in an astounding six halls of fame, including The Minnesota High School Basketball Coaches, Concordia College, Minnesota HS Coaches, Moorhead Hall of Honor, West Fargo High School, and now Peninsula College.

1999-2000 Men’s Basketball Team
The 2000 Pirate men’s basketball team, under head coach Mark Amaral, was the first in Peninsula College history to win a league championship. They also became the first team in Pirate history to earn a No. 1 ranking in the NWAC Coaches’ poll following a nine-game winning streak that propelled them into first place in the North in early February of 2000. After falling to Olympic for one of only two league losses, the Pirates won their last four games to capture the North Region championship. They were among the favorites to win the NWAC Basketball Tournament that year, but an injury and a buzzer-beater contributed to a heart-breaking 71-70 loss to Southwestern Oregon in the opening round. The Pirates went on to place sixth. The PC men finished the season 28-6 overall, which still stands as the most wins in a season in Pirate men’s basketball history. In addition to Coach Amaral, the team’s coaches included Pat Foley, Brant Borghorst and manager Jason Robinson. Players included Olaf Arvidsson of Ostersund, Sweden; Brian Bell of Puyallup; Brent Bevers of Kissee Mills, Missouri; Mike Bowland of Colville; Leroy Johnson of Tacoma; Kenny Lutz of White Salmon; Ray Munyagi of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania; Justin Murray of Tacoma; Masero Nyirabu of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania; Eric Smilay of Port Angeles; Jeff Terrill of Vancouver; Steven Towne of Bothell; Aaron Vandenberg of Quilcene; and Barry Willis of Seattle.

Previous inductees
In 2016, the Peninsula College Athletics Hall of Fame inducted the NWAC champion 2010 men’s soccer team, the late Jim Lunt, Rose Gala Moorhead, Howard “Scooter” Chapman, and Jim Clem. In 2014, the year the Pirate HOF was founded, Peninsula inducted the WAC champion 1970 men’s basketball team, Jerry Allen, the late Art Feiro, Kathy Murphy-Carey, and the late Dr. Wally Sigmar.

PORT ANGELES, Washington (May 11, 2018) – Peninsula College will induct four individuals, Mark Amaral, Curt Bagby, Kent Brauninger, and the late William Quenette, as well as the 1999-2000 men’s basketball team into its Pirate Athletics Hall of Fame at a ceremony scheduled for June 2.

It will be Peninsula’s third induction event, this one set for 5 p.m., June 2, at the Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course banquet room.

“Our committee came up with a great new class of inductees, representing men’s and women’s sports over a span of 37 years of our athletic history,” said Rick Ross, Associate Dean for Athletics and Student Life. “I am personally very happy for Mark, Curt, Kent and the family of Coach Quenette. It will also be great to see the players from the 1999-2000 team again. They had quite a run, winning our first ever league championship and posting the most wins ever for a Pirate basketball team. It’s also cool that they’ve mostly stayed in contact for all these years.”

The event will begin with a social time at 5 p.m. with the program starting at 5:30 p.m. Light refreshments and hors devours will be served, along with a no-host bar. Inductees are asked to reserve space for themselves and their immediate family members by contacting Ross at rross@pencol.edu. Admission is free for inductees, families, friends and guests as space allows.

Mark Amaral
Peninsula College is proud to have been on the front end of Coach Amaral’s outstanding career in college basketball. The College hired Amaral to re-launch men’s basketball in 1997 after the sport was dropped in 1981. He brought six years of assistant coaching experience to Peninsula from Carroll College, Lewis-Clark State and Montana Tech, but was quick to build an exciting and competitive Pirate men’s basketball program as its head coach. He put together a winning record in just his second season (19-9) and then went 28-6 in his third year to win North Region Coach of the Year - and the first league championship in the history of Peninsula College. In his three seasons at Peninsula, he went 58-31, and laid the groundwork for what has been a very successful modern history of Pirate men’s basketball. After three years at the Pirate helm, Coach Amaral went on to join the staff at UC Santa Barbara where he helped coach the Gauchos to two Big West championships and a trip to the NCAA Tournament in a seven-year stint. From there, he served two years at Colorado State, two years at Cal Poly, and then seven years as Associate Head Coach at Pepperdine, where he helped the Wave post its first winning season since 2005 in 2014-15, qualifying for the post season two straight years. Just this spring Coach Amaral accepted a position as Head Assistant Basketball Coach for the Xinjiang Flying Tigers of the CBA in China.

Curt Bagby
Peninsula College was fortunate to hire Curt Bagby as its first intercollegiate women’s basketball coach when the College relaunched basketball in 1997. Coach Bagby came to Peninsula following an outstanding high school career coaching girls’ basketball and football at Port Angeles High School. In his final nine years coaching the Roughrider basketball team, he won seven league championships and made five trips to the state playoffs, including a second-place finish, the best ever in PA girls’ basketball history. At Peninsula, he assembled the very first women’s intercollegiate basketball team from the ground up in 1997 and then went on to win 57 games in four years. Coach Bagby took the Pirates to their first two Northwest Athletic Conference Basketball Tournament appearances in school history and twice won North Region Coach of the Year honors. His overall body of work included 41 years as a highly respected and successful basketball and football coach. His historic and notable contribution to Peninsula College was as a women’s basketball “founding father” who not only achieved success himself, but also laid the ground work for the program’s success that followed.

Kent Brauninger
Kent Brauninger came to Peninsula College in 1968 to teach mathematics. He volunteered to help Athletic Director Art Feiro and the Pirate basketball program as a score clock operator. An outstanding math professor by day, he was at the scorer’s table at night, keeping the precise time and score for Pirate basketball games from 1968-1981 when the College dropped intercollegiate sports. He then returned to the score clock in 1997 when the College re-launched basketball - and he’s been at the table almost every home game since. Kent ran the score clock for more than 500 basketball games. He is also one of Peninsula’s major Pirate Boosters and one of the Colleges’ longest-running Pirate fans. He retired from Peninsula in 2000, but not only stayed on to teach math part time for a few years, but has also remained as a volunteer at the scorer’s table for 18 years…and counting.

William “Bill” Quenette
The late Coach Quenette was the first coach in Peninsula College sports history, hired to teach physical education and to form a “club” basketball team in 1962-63, one year after the College was founded. He then coached Peninsula’s first intercollegiate basketball team a year later in 1963-64 and went on to serve four years as the Pirate head coach. He also coached golf, baseball and track during that time, and helped design the current Pirate gym, which was built in 1966, the year he moved back to Moorhead, Minnesota, where he had started his coaching career at Concordia College in 1957. Coach Quenette would spend the remainder of his 47-year career teaching PE and coaching football, boys and girls basketball, baseball, and golf for Moorhead High School. He was also on the basketball staff at Concordia, and football staff at Fargo Shanley High School in North Dakota. Coach Quenette, who passed away in 2013 following a rich life dedicated to his family, his church, his community, and thousands of student athletes, now resides in an astounding six halls of fame, including The Minnesota High School Basketball Coaches, Concordia College, Minnesota HS Coaches, Moorhead Hall of Honor, West Fargo High School, and now Peninsula College.

1999-2000 Men’s Basketball Team
The 2000 Pirate men’s basketball team, under head coach Mark Amaral, was the first in Peninsula College history to win a league championship. They also became the first team in Pirate history to earn a No. 1 ranking in the NWAC Coaches’ poll following a nine-game winning streak that propelled them into first place in the North in early February of 2000. After falling to Olympic for one of only two league losses, the Pirates won their last four games to capture the North Region championship. They were among the favorites to win the NWAC Basketball Tournament that year, but an injury and a buzzer-beater contributed to a heart-breaking 71-70 loss to Southwestern Oregon in the opening round. The Pirates went on to place sixth. The PC men finished the season 28-6 overall, which still stands as the most wins in a season in Pirate men’s basketball history. In addition to Coach Amaral, the team’s coaches included Pat Foley, Brant Borghorst and manager Jason Robinson. Players included Olaf Arvidsson of Ostersund, Sweden; Brian Bell of Puyallup; Brent Bevers of Kissee Mills, Missouri; Mike Bowland of Colville; Leroy Johnson of Tacoma; Kenny Lutz of White Salmon; Ray Munyagi of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania; Justin Murray of Tacoma; Masero Nyirabu of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania; Eric Smilay of Port Angeles; Jeff Terrill of Vancouver; Steven Towne of Bothell; Aaron Vandenberg of Quilcene; and Barry Willis of Seattle.

Previous inductees
In 2016, the Peninsula College Athletics Hall of Fame inducted the NWAC champion 2010 men’s soccer team, the late Jim Lunt, Rose Gala Moorhead, Howard “Scooter” Chapman, and Jim Clem. In 2014, the year the Pirate HOF was founded, Peninsula inducted the WAC champion 1970 men’s basketball team, Jerry Allen, the late Art Feiro, Kathy Murphy-Carey, and the late Dr. Wally Sigmar.

PORT ANGELES - The annual Pirate Golf Tournament, a fund raiser for athletic scholarships, is set for a 9 a.m. shotgun start on June 2 at Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course.

The 2017 tournament nearly sold out and organizer Mitch Freeman, Peninsula College men's basketball coach, is working hard in hopes of a full field for 2018.

"This is not only a fund raiser for scholarships, but it's a fun end-of-year celebration of Pirate Athletics," said Rick Ross, Associate Dean for Athletics and Student Life. "Coach Freeman and a group of Pirate athletic volunteers put on a great tournament every year and Jerry Allen of 7 Cedars Casino, and Bill Shea and Garrett Smithson of the Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course take very good care of us. Golfers of all abilities can come out and have a great time."

The tournamnent fee is $100 per player, and the golf committee welcomes business leaders to put teams together and get their corporate Tee Sign at one of the 18 holes.

Prizes will go to first and second place in the men's division and first place in the women's division, as well as hole-in-one prizes on par 3 holes sponsored by Wilder Auto Center, KP prizes on select par 3 holes, long drive, as well as two special holes featuring soccer and basketball stations, staffed by Pirate student athletes.

The event will include 18 holes of golf with cart, appetizers and drinks, a tee prize, lunch, and a chance to win prizes, cash and more!

Contact Mitch Freeman at mfreeman@pencol.edu or 360-417-6467 to reserve your spot.

The tournament format is a 4-person scramble. Don't miss the final Pirate Athletics event of the year!

Nov. 1 NWAC Playoff

PORT ANGELES - The NWAC's fourth-ranked Pirates open the playoffs against eighth-ranked Walla Walla at 2 p.m. Wednesday in the First Round of the playoffs right here at Sigmar Field.

The Peninsula men, who are ranked 13th nationally, finished second in the North Region behind top-ranked Whatcom this year with a 10-1-4 league record and a 12-2-4 overall mark. They scored 61 goals, second only to Whatcom's 63, and gave up 27.

Walla Walla finished third in the East Region behind Spokane and Columbia Basin with an 8-4 record, 11-5 overall. The Warriors scored 35 goals this year and allowed 19.

Individually, Peninsula has a host of players among the NWAC leaders. Cesar Gervacio, who pulled a hamstring in Peninsula's 4-3 win over Edmonds Saturday and is questionable for this week, leads the NWAC in scoring with 18 goals, Juan Carrillo is third with 15 and Joey Hollimon is seventh with 12. Pirate Adrian Benitez is second in assists with nine and Carillo is sixth with six.

Walla Walla is led by Missael Lopez, who has 11 goals, and Freddy Rodriguez with seven.

The winner of Wednesday's NWAC First Round playoff will travel to Portland Saturday to tackle the South Region champion Panthers in the NWAC Quarterfinals. The winner of that match advances to the Final Four, set for Nov. 10-12 at Starfire Sports in Tukwila.

Nov. 4 NWAC Playoff

PORT ANGELES - The NWAC's top-ranked Pirates, who sit No. 7 in the latest national junior college poll, are riding a 36-match winning streak into the playoffs dating back to September 5, 2016. They open the playoffs with a home match at noon on Nov. 4 against Wednesday's First Round winner.

The Peninsula women smashed the single season NWAC scoring record in their final home match against Edmonds, when they put 13 balls in the Triton net. The Pirates, in just 18 matches, scored 135 goals and have allowed just nine. The previous scoring record of 129 goals was set by by Walla Walla in 2007 in 24 matches.

The Pirates are led by Sydney Warren, who leads the NWAC in scoring with 30 goals. Taylor Graham is sixth in the NWAC with 14 goals, Maddy Parton is ninth with 13, Janis Martinez-Ortiz has 12, Kelly Kevershan 11 and Jayna Morikawa 11. The Pirates also have a host of players leading in the assist column, led by Jordyn DiCintio with 27, Kevershan with 10, Martinez-Ortiz with 10 and Parton with nine.

Johnny Martinez

PORT ANGELES – The Pirate women responded to a drop from No. 1 to No. 4 in the Alaska Airlines Northwest Athletic Conference Coaches Poll by defeating the new top-ranked team Saturday, while the second-ranked men rallied in the second half to complete a home sweep over Everett.

Both teams now sit atop the North Division with eight matches remaining. The PC women are 6-1-0 in conference play and 11-1-0 overall, tied with Everett (6-1-0, 8-2-1). The Pirate men, meanwhile, improved to 6-0-1 and 8-1-2, and five points ahead of second place Whatcom (4-1-2, 5-2-2).

The Pirates travel to Skagit Valley on Wednesday and then turn right around for an even longer road trip to Bellingham on Saturday to face Whatcom.

Men: Pirates 7, Trojans 3

On paper, the conference-leading Pirates were supposed to be able to phone this one in against winless Everett, but soccer matches aren’t played on paper.

Peninsula, playing without several starters, took a 1-0 lead in the 11th minute on a goal by Keo Ponce, but that was all they could muster in the first half against a determined and underrated Everett club, which used a PC own goal to make it 1-1 at the break.

The Pirates then made it 2-0 on a goal by Johnny Martinez five minutes into the second half, but Everett countered seven minutes later on a goal by Brendan Aune.

The Pirates finally shook Everett down the stretch, as Ponce scored the go-ahead goal, and then it was the Martinez show, as the freshman finished the match with four goals. Joe Sorenson also got in on the scoring act on a very nice header in the box to win going away.

Contributing assists for Peninsula were Eddie Benito with three, Jonathan Vasquez with two, and Jared Ortiz and Martinez with one each.

Nick Johnson finished with three saves.

Women: Pirates 2, Trojans 1

It’s a little early to talk about a conference championship, but Saturday’s home match against Everett certainly figures prominently in that race. The Trojans beat the Pirates back on Sept. 16 at Everett and Peninsula was looking to even the score at home, where they have never lost to Everett.

This match attracted media from the Peninsula Daily News, the Sequim Gazette and Radio KONP, as well as a the normal Pirate fan base – and the turned out to be a good one.

Peninsula scored first, just 26 minutes in, on a put-back from Hoku Afong when a shot by Lexi Krieger was blocked by Trojan keeper Emily Sorenson and Afong was there to drill it into the back of the net.

Everett, however, struck right back, capitalizing on a defensive error and some nice foot work by Ava Mana’o, who scored just a minute later.

That score stood through halftime, and then it was Afong again coming up big just eight minutes into the second half, beating Everett defenders through the box and curling the ball around Sorenson for what proved to be the game-winner.

Sorenson had another outstanding match in goal for Everett, swatting away eight Pirate shots in all, including a rocket by Ellie Small, but not to be outdone, PC keeper Manaia Siania-Unutoa recorded six saves, several of those with very athletic moves in traffic, and one at point-blank range, to preserve the victory.

When the final whistle sounded, the Pirates mobbed Siania-Unutoa, celebrating a win that puts them back in the driver’s seat in their quest for the North Division championship.

Johnny Martinez winds up for one of his four goals against Everett. Photo by Jay Cline

 

Miranda Schmillen, Ryley Callaghan, Kasie Lough, Micah Weller, Cherish Moss and Karen Corral were honored at Peninsula College’s annual awards ceremony Thursday at the Cornaby Center.

Schmillen and Callaghan received the Art Feiro Award for women’s and men’s basketball in recognition of outstanding contribution to leadership, athleticism, academics and citizenship.

Lough and Weller were named the Wally Sigmar Award for women’s and men’s soccer, also for outstanding leadership, athleticism, academics and citizenship.

Moss and Corral were the 2014-15 William and Annie McMullen Award winners, an award specifically for freshmen female athletes who were inspirational, dedicated, accomplished and were outstanding ambassadors to their respective sports.

“It will be an honor to etch these six names onto trophies that will become part of Pirate sports history,” said Rick Ross, Associate Dean for Athletics and Student Life. “Our coaches had so many choices for these awards, and these six athletes represent all of the outstanding and dedicated athletes who, year in and year out, continue to put Peninsula College and this community on the map.”

Come join the Peninsula College Pirates for our annual spring basketball camp! Friday we will be focusing on the fundamentals, and we will improve our skills through a variety of drills and competitive games. After we work hard and improve on Friday, we will make teams based on skill levels and come back Saturday for our camp tournament! Saturday will consist of live 5-on-5 games that will be both coached and officiated by our college athletes, and they are open to spectators so that everyone can come see you play! So if you want to have fun playing hoops, and improve your skills in the process, then sign up for our spring basketball camp today! Go Pirates!

Click "Read More" for all the details & how to sign up!

March 13-14, 2015

Friday 8am-2pm

Saturday 10am-1pm

Peninsula College Gym

Camp fee is $75

Register online at www.brownpapertickets.com and search "pirate spring basketball camp"

OR

Register at the door Friday, March 13th. Doors open at 7:45am.

Campers must bring their own gym shoes, water bottle, basketball, and a lunch for Friday.

for more information, please contact Jon Ing at Jing@pencol.edu

PORT ANGELES – Art Ruud, who helped Peninsula College win the Washington Athletic Association of Community Colleges state basketball championship in 1970, passed away Saturday with his family at his side. He was 64.

Art and his teammates from that 1970 Pirate team, were inducted into the Northwest Athletic Conference Hall of Fame and the Peninsula College Hall of Fame in January of 2014.

“I’m so thrilled for Art and his family that we were able to induct them into both Halls of Fame last year,” said Peninsula College Athletic Director Rick Ross. “He played such a big role in that team’s success and consequently played a big role in Peninsula College sports history.

“Art was not a fan of the spotlight, but he was a great athlete, a great family man, a great coach, and a great member of this community,” Ross said. “Our thoughts and prayers are with his family.”

Art’s accomplishments will be recognized during halftime of the Peninsula College men’s game on Saturday. Game time is 7 p.m.

His Pirate head coach Jack Estes said he was shocked to hear the news.

“Art Ruud had that solid jump shot from the corner, that soaring long ball into right field, and the driest sense of humor of anyone I’ve known,” Estes said. “His humor was the definition of dry. His athletic ability impressed me and his humor absolutely cracked me up.”

A talented athlete from his youth, Art played both basketball and baseball, setting a Port Angeles Little League record for home runs in a single season.

He went on to play through college and into adult basketball and softball leagues, as well as coaching youth teams.

Art was a lifelong and active member of Holy Trinity Lutheran Church where he co-taught Sunday school and served as an usher. In the church, he married Kathy in 1972 and together they raised four children. He was a devoted and caring father.

After a short time teaching at Port Angeles High School, he became an electrician. In 1980 he and his brother, Rob, formed an electrical contracting company which would become Electric Service, Inc.

Art is survived by Kathy, by four children: Melissa (Angel), Heidi Barabe (Ryan), Jessica, and Joel; three grandchildren: Carson, Hunter, and Kiera; his brothers: Rob (Margaret), and Dan (Arlene); and four nieces and their children.

 

Instead of flowers the family requests that donations be made to the Holy Trinity Lutheran Church Scholarship Fund. Donations made in Art’s name can be sent to 301 Lopez Ave. Port Angeles, WA 98362.

Peninsula College’s Pirate Women Basketball players are stars on and off the court, and in the eyes of several young women from the community they are also something much more─they are heroes and mentors and friends.

Community residents who attended Pirate home games last year probably wondered about the younger basketball players who lined up with the Pirate women players during the playing of the national anthem. What they didn’t know is that the young women were part of an important outreach effort by the Pirate women, and that several of the Pirate team members were spending their weekends and nights working with the younger players and watching them play in their own games and tournaments.

Today the college players are known as the Pirate Pals, and Pirate Coach Alison Crumb couldn’t be prouder. The PC program has its genesis in a similar program that Crumb was involved in when she played for the Roughriders at Port Angeles High School (PAHS) under then coach Mike Knowles, who today is an assistant Pirate basketball coach. Knowles began a “Rider Pal” mentoring program that placed player mentors with younger aspiring PAHS basketball players, and the program was very successful. Today, both Crumb and Knowles are proud to see the Pirate Pals program reaching new heights.

According to Crumb, this year the Pirate women’s team is taking the Pirate Pals program to a whole new level. Just after the Pirate women had their first preseason meeting─and after being on campus for only 24 hours─the Pirates put on a free basketball camp for their Pirate Pals. The players ran the entire camp and worked with the girls on skill building as well as coaching them in a 3-on-3 tournament. After the camp, both teams ate pizza together and got to know each other a little better. And this is just the beginning, Crumb says!

“Every week during the coming year, the Pirates will be working with their pals after practice and on weekends to give back to the community and to inspire young basketball players that are like themselves when they were younger.

“This is an incredible opportunity for our athletes to mentor young players who idolize them. Our pirate women step on the floor, and these young girls follow everything they do. With that comes great responsibility, and it helps our players become better leaders, better citizens, and better basketball players,” Crumb says.

And Crumb has made sure that the parents of the Pirate Pals know the Pirate players are truly committed. “When I was introducing the PC players to the Pirate Pals and their parents, I told them we are here for them and support our team in putting in all this extra time to help the Pals better their craft. Afterwards, a parent came up to me and said how much it means to these girls that we are doing this, and that they, too, are here for us and whatever we need. That is what’s it’s all about. It’s about a partnership, and our program believes it’s important,” Crumb says.

Crumb adds that throughout the preseason when the Pirates are training, often twice a day, “three days a week the Pirate Pals will be on campus working with our student-athletes. Thanks to assistant Pirate coaches Mike Knowles and Danika Johnson, Olympic Avalanche coach Joe Marvelle, and the Pirate program, our team has expanded, and we’re excited for our Pirate Pals and their families to be a part of our Pirate Family.”

Pirate Pals In Action!

PORT ANGELES – Six Peninsula College athletes received awards at Tuesday’s annual awards event at the Board of Trustees June meeting Tuesday afternoon.

Alison Knowles of Port Angeles and Geno Horsley of Tacoma won the 2013-14 Art Feiro Awards for basketball, Briana Estrellado of Cheney, and Corbyn May, of Vancouver, B.C., were the 2013-14 Wally Sigmar Award winners for soccer, and Brooke Yoshimura of Mililani, HI, and Madison Pilster, of Blackfoot, ID, received the Annie McMullen Award for soccer and basketball respectively.

The Art Feiro and Wally Sigmar awards go to students representing each team who best exemplified leadership, sportsmanship, citizenship, academic achievement and athletic ability. The McMullen family award is specifically for freshmen women athletes who have overcome challenges through hard work and dedication to be successful in their sport.

“These six athletes represent a class of student athletes who were truly outstanding,” said Director of Athletics Rick Ross. “Sadly, Alison, Bri and Corbyn have completed their playing careers at Peninsula College and we’re going to miss them enormously. They have set a very high bar for their respective teams to follow next year.”

“Geno, Brooke and Madison, however, will be back next year to establish high standards of leadership, citizenship, sportsmanship, and academic success to go along with their competitive drive as athletes,” Ross said.

Estrellado, May and Yoshimura played a role in Peninsula’s unprecedented success in soccer, leading the Pirate women and men to back-to-back NWAACC championships this year. The women’s basketball team qualified for the NWAACC Championship Tournament and the men’s team missed going by one place in the North Division standings.

“We won two more NWAACC championships this year and three of our four teams reached the post season,” Ross said. “It’s a credit to all of our student athletes, and to our coaches who work so hard to recruit talented kids with high character and citizenship skills. I was very proud to introduce our six award winners to the Board today. They represent this institution at a very high level.” 

PORT ANGELES -The 1970 Peninsula College men’s basketball team, which was led by Bernie Fryer, who had a successful career as an official and a player in the NBA, headlined the first inductees into the newly formed Peninsula College Athletics Hall of Fame at a ceremony held January17, at the Bushwhacker Restaurant.

In addition to the Washington Athletic Association of Community Colleges championship team, the first inductees also included the late Arthur Feiro, the late Dr. Wally Sigmar, Kathy Murphy-Carey and Jerry Allen.

“This is something we’ve been talking about for some time,” said Director of Athletics Rick Ross. “We haven’t had a facility before where we could properly house a Hall of Fame, but our new gymnasium foyer lends itself perfectly to that. I’m honored and thrilled that this is finally happening.”

Peninsula College also collaborated with the Northwest Athletic Association of Community Colleges to dually induct the 1970 basketball team. Fryer was inducted into the NWAACC Hall of Fame as an individual in 1992, but the entire team went in at the ceremony on Friday. Feiro was previously inducted into the NWAACC Hall of Fame in 1989, and Dr. Sigmar in 1995.

“This was a unique opportunity to start our own Hall of Fame and also to work with the NWAACC to bring in the 1970 team at the same time,” Ross said. “There are many deserving candidates to go into our Hall, but we’re starting with five and will build that over the coming years.” 

1970 Men’s Basketball Team

While the college has been on a championship run of late, with five NWAACC soccer championships and one basketball title in just the last four years, for its first 50 years the buzz in the sports community was all about the 1970 team.

Jerry Allen, CEO of Seven Cedars Casino who is part of the organizing committee for the Hall of Fame event, called that team’s state championship the first such major accomplishment in Port Angeles’ sports history.

“That was a big deal,” Allen said. “We had the 1966 Port Angeles team place second and some minor sports championships, but that was the first major championship in this community’s history.”

Fryer, who stepped down from his position as Vice President and Director of Officials for the NBA two years ago, continues to work for the NBA as an advisor and video specialist for its officials. He said he is looking forward to the event.

“It is very rewarding to have our team be remembered for the success we had,” Fryer said. “For me personally, my experience at Peninsula was, and still is, one of the best of my basketball career.”

Fryer scored 57 points in Peninsula’s come-from-behind, double-overtime 132-130 win over Lower Columbia in the championship game. That still stands as the single game scoring record for an NWAACC playoff game.

However, what made the win so memorable was that it was a Cinderella story and a team effort that won them the championship, according to head coach Jack Estes, who now resides in Manhattan, NY.

“Bernie was clearly the star, but he wasn't alone,” Estes said. “This was really a team, a group of young men who worked together. They passed, and they pressed, and they shared the victory.”

“I had a dream mid-season that we won the championship,” Estes said. “This was a magical season. A small-sized team from a small town representing the smallest college in the state went up against big budgets and big players from big schools. I still can't believe it. When we were down by a score of 100-81 with only six minutes remaining, playing at our opponent's home court and having been beaten badly by that same team only two weeks earlier, 129-91, how did we pull it out? Unbelievable still, all these years later.”

According to Peninsula College records, members of that team included Larry Baker, Mitch Blore, Rocky Brecht, Bernie Fryer, Bob Jones, Keith Lingvall, Brad Maier, Bud O’Meara, Harley Robinson, Art Ruud, Dan Ruud, Darrl Sanford, Dan Schleiffers, Jack Werkau and manager Mark Bowes.

In addition to the ceremony on Friday, the college honored the inductees in front of the home fans and officially retired Fryer’s jersey No. 32 during halftime of the men’s game.

Arthur Feiro

The late Art Feiro was a member of Peninsula College’s faculty when the institution opened its doors in 1961. In addition to teaching and paving the way for the establishment of a marine laboratory, later named for him, Feiro served the college as Athletic Director, Director of Intramurals and Dean of Students.

He was instrumental in the success of the 1970 championship basketball team, and he helped found the NWAACC in the early 1970s, transitioning from the WAACC. He also hired Kathy Murphy-Carey in 1975 to coach the first NWAACC women’s sports teams. He passed away the same year Peninsula College dropped its athletic program in 1982.

   “Art was such a big part of Peninsula’s history, it was a slam dunk that he would be among the first wave of inductees into our Hall of Fame,” Ross said. “He was everybody’s favorite teacher, he was a ferocious competitor, he was an innovator, and he was an outstanding leader. No one talks about our history without sharing stories about Art.”

Dr. Wally Sigmar

The late Dr. Sigmar became President of Peninsula College in 1995 and was instrumental in bringing athletics back to Peninsula College in 1997 and improving the college’s athletic facility with new bleachers, a new gym floor surface, scoreboards and a field reconstruction to support soccer and softball. The college fielded men’s and women’s basketball teams starting in the fall of 1997 and added men’s soccer and women’s softball in the fall of 2000.

Sigmar was inducted into the NWAACC Hall of Fame in 1995 for winning five NWAACC championships during an 11-year coaching career at Skagit Valley College (1974-1982).

Peninsula’s fourth President passed away in 2000, just two months before the first Pirate soccer team took the field.

“Wally was the people’s President,” Ross said. “He made every employee, every community member, and I’m sure his colleagues across the region, all feel like close personal friends.

“His passion for athletics and his leadership with our committee changed the face of our college,” said Ross, who served with Dr. Sigmar, Jim Lunt, the late Roger Reidel, who was Board of Trustees Chair, and several community members during the 1996-97 academic year when the NWAACC approved Peninsula’s request to join the conference. “Athletics is one small piece of what makes this College a destination college, but Sigmar set the bar pretty high and we’ve strived all these years to run the kind of program he would have been proud of.”

Kathy Murphy-Carey

Kathy Murphy-Carey, who retired in December, was hired by Art Feiro in 1975 as a counselor, volleyball coach and tennis coach. She was also named Peninsula Women's Athletic Commissioner and served in that role from 1975-1982. She continued in her role as a faculty member and counselor during the period Peninsula was without athletics and returned to her commissioner role when the college re-launched men's and women's basketball in 1997. Since that date, Kathy has served as North Region Chair Women's Basketball Chair and the NWAACC Executive Board. She has also played a significant role in Peninsula College athletics, serving on hiring committees for coaches; counseling, advising and inspiring student athletes; and helping the program win six NWAACC championships in the last four years.

"Kathy's contribution to our success is immeasurable," said Ross. "She has worked very hard for this college in a career that spanned almost 40 years. She has positively impacted thousands of student athletes in that time and has been a great friend and mentor to me, as well as our coaches. I am very happy for her that she is represented in our first Hall of Fame. She is very deserving of this honor." 

Jerry Allen

Jerry Allen's relationship with Peninsula College began as a basketball player in the mid-1970s, but it was his impact as CEO of Seven Cedar's Casino that changed the course of Peninsula College athletics in 1997 when the institution brought back men's and women's basketball. The Casino, in cooperation with the Jamestown Tribe, as been the largest contributor of scholarship donations and general support of the athletic program for the last 16 years. Seven Cedars has sponsored leagues, tournaments, events, as well as sponsorships and donations.

"Jerry is a pretty humble guy and was quick to credit the Casino and the Jamestown Tribe for that support," Ross said. "We are very blessed to have their support. There are many deserving organizations out there, but Jerry and Ron understand the value of an athletic program in the development of young people, as well as its value to a college and a community. We wouldn't be where we are as a program without Seven Cedar's Casino and Jerry's leadership."